The Keys to a Successful Mobile App Strategy

4 04 2013

processThere are many phases in the testing of any mobile app or website, specifically when it comes to QA and development. Within development (or pre-launch) there is Functional Testing, Usability Testing, and Performance Testing, amongst others. And in production (post-launch) there is Benchmark Testing, Availability Monitoring, and Performance Monitoring. All of these types of testing are critical to the success of any mobile platform. While there are many factors that can affect an apps success,  the importance of having a mobile strategy that incorporates testing is crucial.

For development teams the use of emulators and real devices for testing is vital to ensure the app or site is of the highest quality to avoid pitfalls such as misplaced images, non-functioning apps, apps crashing, broken links, etc.

For Web sites or Web apps it is viewable by users around the world. Even if you’re initially targeting only users in a single country or on a single network, it helps to understand the global dynamic.

When you test mobile Web apps or sites you encounter several challenges presented by the nature of the global, mobile Web. As we understand the nature of each challenge, we can explore different technology options to manage issues and mitigate risk. Coming up with the right solutions for your requires an assessment of the advantages and disadvantages inherent in each of the testing options available to you and determining the technology that best suits your testing requirements. These mobile testing challenges include

devices, network, and scripting.
For native apps, while application testing has always been an important step in the application development process, its importance is becoming even more critical for the following reasons, as adapted from an ABI whitepaper:

  • Mobile applications drive productivity – they must work.
  • Device platforms vary – applications developed for one platform must work on other platforms. For example, device fragmentation on different Android devices.
  • Applications will evolve – as worker’s needs and responsibilities change, applications will be both upgraded as well as downgraded in functionality.
  • Cloud systems affect where data is stored. In addition, authorizations and connectivity APIs are not consistent across cloud service providers.
  • Multiple wireless networks – businesses connect to different radio networks based on network capabilities, worker needs, and contractual relationships. But all of these conditions can change which will require modifying the application.
  • Operator choice – devices commissioned for use on a network in France may be recommissioned for use on a network in Germany. Or a business may change mobile operators. Applications will need to be tested on different operator networks to ensure consistent connectivity when upgrading in-the-field devices.
  • Worker demographics will change device type and application.
Advertisements